Reducing Vulnerabilities and Promoting Resilience in Children and Youth Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV)

Topic(s)

Webinar event date

Nov 20, 2018 10:00 am EST

Webinar registration link

Webinar Presenters

Dr. Ramona Alaggia

Presenter

 

Dr. Ramona Alaggia is a Professor of Social Work, at the Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social at the University of Toronto with a cross-appointment to the Women and Gender Studies Institute. She focuses her teaching and research on gender based violence, trauma, resilience and mental health. Dr. Alaggia’s work is conducted through a trauma and resilience informed lens. She researches child sexual abuse disclosures, children’s resilience in the context of intimate partner violence, experiences of women surviving intimate partner violence (IPV), how immigrant and refugee families are affected by IPV, and how services can best respond. She co-edited the ground-breaking book “Cruel but not Unusual: Violence in Canadian Families”. Dr. Alaggia presents her research across Canada and internationally in Scotland, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Germany and the US.

 

Description

If you cannot make the live event, register now to be sent a link to the On-Demand version to view at your convenience. 

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The “Make Resilience Matter” project uses NLSCY findings which show that IPV exposed children with better psycho-social outcomes have higher levels of school connectedness, family cohesion and social supports.

The qualitative data from this project support these results with interview participants reporting school/school related activities, extended family and social supports as contributing to their resilience processes.

These findings indicate that environments are critical to resilience promotion. Helping professionals need to enlist schools as vital resilience resources for youth for healthy outlets from violent environments. Extended family members and supportive adults are also crucial for these youth to turn to, as are strong social support networks. Availability of these options outside of the home appear to contribute to resilient outcomes for vulnerable IPV exposed youth.